Breast Cancer Facts

10 Oct

(Don’t forget about Comics Go Pink today!)

Quoted from The State of Breast Cancer:

  • Today [2007], a person who has been diagnosed with breast cancer in the earliest stages has a 98 percent chance of living at least five more years, on average, compared to only 77 percent in 1982.
  • The overall breast cancer death rate has decreased by about 2 percent each year since 1990.

From “Understanding Breast Cancer” (I recommend visiting this site directly for much excellent information):

  • About 207,090 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 54,010 new cases of in situ breast cancer will occur among women in the United States during 2010.
  • An estimated 39,840 women will die from breast cancer this year.
  • About 1,970 men will be diagnosed and 390 men will die of breast cancer during 2010 in the United States.
  • As screening programs have become more common, more cases of breast cancer are being found in earlier stages, when they are more easily and successfully treated.

* * * * *

Also from “Understanding Breast Cancer”:

Due to the increased use of mammography, most women are diagnosed at very early stages of breast cancer, before symptoms appear. However, not all breast cancer is found through mammography. The most common symptoms of breast cancer are a change in the look or feel of the breast, a change in the look or feel of the nipple and nipple discharge. These are listed below:

  • Lump, hard knot or thickening
  • Swelling, warmth, redness or darkening
  • Change in the size or shape of the breast
  • Dimpling or puckering of the skin
  • Itchy, scaly sore or rash on the nipple
  • Pulling in of your nipple or other parts of the breast
  • Nipple discharge that starts suddenly
  • New pain in one spot that doesn’t go away

Adapted from National Cancer Institute [25,26], American Cancer Society [27], and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [28].

* * * * *

The following changes in the breast or nipple can be warning signs of male breast cancer:

Adapted from the Harris et al. [46], American Society of Clinical Oncology [54] and Mayo Clinic materials [55].

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